Category Archives: Culture

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The solution in the US/abroad? Increasingly worse chemicals being dumped on our soil and ending up in our rain/waterways/drinking sources. If you only care about your wallet, it’ll mean that water treatment plants will have to upgrade their facilities to treat these chemicals (Blanchester OH just had to spend $6mil) and that cost will come out of your wallet as a rate payer. In the meantime, it’s slowly affecting your health because you’re drinking these chemicals on a daily basis….

 

Brazil farmers say GMO corn no longer resistant to pests

SAO PAULO Mon Jul 28, 2014 6:59pm EDT

(Reuters) – Genetically modified corn seeds are no longer protecting Brazilian farmers from voracious tropical bugs, increasing costs as producers turn to pesticides, a farm group said on Monday.

Producers want four major manufacturers of so-called BT corn seeds to reimburse them for the cost of spraying up to three coats of pesticides this year, said Ricardo Tomczyk, president of Aprosoja farm lobby in Mato Grosso state.

“The caterpillars should die if they eat the corn, but since they didn’t die this year producers had to spend on average 120 reais ($54) per hectare … at a time that corn prices are terrible,” he said.

Large-scale farming in the bug-ridden tropics has always been a challenge, and now Brazil’s government is concerned that planting the same crops repeatedly with the same seed technologies has left the agricultural superpower vulnerable to pest outbreaks and dependent on toxic chemicals.

Experts in the United States have also warned about corn production prospects because of a growing bug resistance to genetically modified corn. Researchers in Iowa found significant damage from rootworms in corn fields last year.

In Brazil, the main corn culprit is Spodoptera frugiperda, also known as the corn leafworm or southern grassworm.

Seed companies say they warned Brazilian farmers to plant part of their corn fields with conventional seeds to prevent bugs from mutating and developing resistance to GMO seeds.

Dow Agrosciences, a division of Dow Chemical Co, has programs in Brazil to help corn farmers develop “an integrated pest management system that includes, among other things, the cultivation of refuge areas,” it said in an email.

Another company, DuPont, said it had not received any formal notification from Aprosoja. The company’s Pioneer brand has been working with producers to extend the durability of its seed technology and improve efficiency since Spodoptera worms were found to have developed resistance to the Cry1F protein, it said in a statement.

Monsanto Co also said in a statement that it has not been formally notified by the group. The other company, Syngenta AG, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Tomczyk, who also spoke for Brazilian farmers during a dispute over seed royalty payments to Monsanto that ended last year, said Aprosoja encouraged the planting of refuge areas. But he said the seed companies have not given clear instructions.

“There are barely any non-GMO seeds available … it is very uncomfortable that the companies are blaming the farmers,” he said. Aprosoja hopes to reach a negotiated agreement with the seed companies, but if all else fails farmers may sue to get reparations for pesticide costs, he added.

Brazil is harvesting its second of two annual corn crops and expects to produce 78 million tonnes this crop year, slightly less than last season’s record. Domestic prices recently fell to their lowest in four years because of abundant supplies.

($1 = 2.223 reais)

(Reporting by Caroline Stauffer; Editing by Lisa Shumaker and Steve Orlofsky)

The Zen Of Attraction

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The Zen Of Attraction

Zen CircleIf Less Is More, Then Nothing Is Everything

I’ve been responding to the idea of attraction put out by the less than scientific Secret folks and found a really cool spin on it by the more practical Coachville community. I’ve abridged the principles and expanded the message.

Ten Principles To The Zen Of Attraction

  1. Promise Nothing
    Just do what you most enjoy doing.
    Hidden benefit: You will always over-deliver.
  2. Offer Nothing
    Just share what you have with those who express an interest in it.
    Hidden benefit: Takes the pressure off of wanting other people to see you as valuable or important.
  3. Expect Nothing
    Just enjoy what you already have. It’s plenty.
    Hidden benefit: You will realize how complete your life is already.
  4. Need Nothing
    Just build up your reserves and your needs will disappear.
    Hidden benefit: You boundaries will be extended and filled with space.
  5. Create Nothing
    Just respond well to what comes to you.
    Hidden benefit: Openness.
  6. Hype Nothing
    Just let quality sell by itself.
    Hidden benefit: Trustability.
  7. Plan Nothing
    Just take the path of least resistance.
    Hidden benefit: Achievement will become effortless.
  8. Learn Nothing
    Just let your body absorb it all on your behalf.
    Hidden benefit: You will become more receptive to what you need to know in the moment.
  9. Become No One
    Just be more of yourself.
    Hidden benefit: Authenticity.
  10. Change Nothing
    Just tell the truth and things will change by themselves.
    Hidden benefit: Acceptance.

‘Sustainability’ Gone Awry: China Turns Sewer Waste Into Cooking Oil

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“Gutter oil” industry takes street slop and animal scraps and renders it into black-market cooking oil.

Considering the rampant amount of food waste that occurs in America, the move toward thriftiness in regards to utilizing scraps and leftovers is a promising development.

For restaurants (and home cooks) who work with whole animals, from chickens to 300 pound hogs, rendering the fat from scraps of meat is one delicious way to make sure as much of the animal can be utilized as possible.

In China, however, that mentality has been taken to disgusting, dangerous ends in what’s known at the Gutter Oil Industry.

In a video posted on AlterNet, produced by Radio Free Asia, a woman is shown pulling slop out of the sewer, scooping up globs of crud into a bucket. “Her slop eventually winds up in a processing plant like this one,” says the narrator, the screen showing a bubbling vat, “where its combined with other animal fat refuse to create recycled cooking oil.”

Remember London’s “fatberg”? Gutter oil is basically a rendered, refined cooking oil based on similar such waste. Unsurprisingly, the cheap cooking oil has been found to contain carcinogens and other toxins. But in China, oil, a requisite for wok-cooking, is in high demand, and the cheap price of gutter oil draws customers despite the grease’s source. The video says that an estimated 1/10 of oil sold in China is gutter oil.

And that sizable market means this form of recycling is big (albeit illegal) business. As AlterNet’s Rod Bastanmehr notes, the government recently moved to shutdown black market production in 13 cities.

“The shutdown occurred after a five-month investigation yielded a reported 3,200 tons of gutter oil,” Bastanmehr writes, “which authorities estimated had been sold to a staggering $1.6 million profit.”

Mapping the migration of words

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Mapping the migration of words: Infographic reveals the roots of Europe’s languages and how countries are linked to the wider world

  • Words in the maps, such as rose, church and tea, show a shared history
  • For instance, differences in the word ‘tea’ are largely due to trade routes
  • Dutch traders had their main contacts in Fujian and used ‘tea’ or ‘thee;
  • Eastern Europe and Asia, which got their tea overland, tend to use forms such as chai

By Ellie Zolfagharifard

PUBLISHED: 12:50 EST, 15 November 2013 | UPDATED: 12:51 EST, 15 November 2013

A cup of tea or a mug of ‘cha’ might taste the same, but the choice of words for the brew can reveal a great deal about a person’s ancestry and even the history of the world.

Recently published maps plotting the different words used for various objects make it clear that a simple term can say a lot about a country.

The infographics, posted by Reddit user Bezbojnicul, show that some seemingly mundane words can explain a country’s links to trade, its history of conflict and migration.

Enlarge   etymology maps by Reddit user Bezbojnicul The maps show how many words for ‘tea’ found in different languages are ultimately of Chinese origin. Languages spoken in eastern Europe and Asia which got their tea overland rather than from the Dutch tend to use forms such as chai

For example, there are many words for ‘tea’ found in different languages but are all ultimately of the same Chinese origin.

Those differences, however, give an insight into how the product arrived in the country.

The Dutch traders, who were the main importers of tea into Europe, had their main contacts in Amoy in Fujian.

For this reason they adopted the word for ‘tea’ as ‘thee’, and in this form it then spread to large parts of Europe.

Enlarge   etymology maps by Reddit user Bezbojnicul The English word rose comes from French, which itself comes from Latin rosa – one of the languages that most influenced English. Interestingly, the map shows how garoful, the ancient Greek word for rose, today only remains in north eastern Italy

The first European tea importers in the 16th century, however, were Portuguese.

Portuguese uses the term ‘chá’, derived from Cantonese ‘cha’.

As a result, languages spoken in eastern Europe and Asia which got their tea overland rather than from the Dutch tend to use forms such as ‘chai’.

These European Etymology maps provide a fascinating insight into how words have changed across a geographical area.

The English word ‘rose’, for instance, comes from French, which itself comes from Latin ‘rosa’ – one of the languages that most influenced English.

Enlarge   Church Church is common to many Teutonic, Slavonic and other languages under various forms. In German it is kirche, in Swedish kirka in Danish kirke and in Finnish kirkko

The modern Persian word for ‘rose’ is ‘gul’, which developed through a series of regular sound changes from the word ‘varda’.

Interestingly, the map shows how ‘garoful’, the ancient Greek word for ‘rose’, today only remains in the north east of Italy.

The maps also reveals how Greek influenced the English word ‘church’.

‘Church’ is common to many Teutonic, Slavonic and other languages under various forms.

In German it is ‘kirche’, in Swedish ‘kirka’, in Danish ‘kirke’ and in Finnish ‘kirkko’.

These all originate from the Greek word ‘ecclesia’ which means ‘assembly’, with the meaning of the word transferred from the community to the building.

Enlarge   etymology maps by Reddit user Bezbojnicul In many places the pineapple has a name similar to ananas derives from nana, a Tupi Indian term for the fruit. Christopher Columbus is alleged to have named the pineapple, calling it the ‘pine of the Indies’ due to its resemblance to a pine cone.

The word pineapple, however, seems to be something of an anomaly.

In many countries, it has a name similar to ‘ananas’, which derives from ‘nana’, a Tupi Indian term for the fruit.

Christopher Columbus is alleged to have named the pineapple, calling it the ‘pine of the Indies’ due to its resemblance to a pine cone.

Another unusual word illustrated on a map is for the orange fruit. In the West it comes from Sanskrit narangas (‘orange tree’).

Enlarge   etymology maps by Reddit user Bezbojnicul ‘Apple’ has a lot of diversity. The word in Finland and Estonia may come from an Indo-Iranian origin

However, the dominant word in much of eastern and northern Europe comes from a word meaning ‘apple’ from China, such as the Dutch word ‘sinaasappel.’

‘Apple’, meanwhile, has a great deal of diversity. The word in Finland and Estonia may come from an Indo-Iranian origin.

‘Bear’ seems to be influenced by Russia which has the largest brown bear population in Europe can be found.

The most dominant word literally means ‘honey-eater.’

BearBear seems to be influenced by Russia which has the largest brown bear population in Europe can be found

30 Unique and Must-See Photos From our Past

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30 Unique And Must-See Photos From Our Past

Alex Wain May 30, 2013 49

Photographs have long been used to record special and unique moments – birthdays, weddings and the occasional selfie are all commonplace. But these next 30 photographs go beyond the norm – they encapsulate the mood, tone and values of yesteryear, a compelling account of the evolution of our values if you will.

From landmarks in history, strange feats of physical endurance through to peculiar devices & oddball characters we hope this series of images will astound, confound and enthrall you.

1. Unpacking the Head of the Statue of Liberty delivered June 17, 1885

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

2. The hippo belonged to a circus and apparently enjoyed pulling the cart as a trick 1924

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

3. Charlie Chaplin in 1916 at the age of 27

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

4. Annie Edison Taylor (1838-1921), the first person to survive going over Niagara Falls in a barrel in 1901.

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

5. Sharing bananas with a goat during the Battle of Saipan, ca. 1944

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

6. Advertisement for Atabrine, an anti-malaria drug. Papua, New Guinea during WWII

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

7. Artificial legs, United Kingdom, ca. 1890

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

8. 1920′s lifeguard

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

9. Bookstore ruined by an air raid, London 1940

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

10. Testing new bulletproof vests, 1923

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

11. Suntan vending machine, 1949

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

12. A space chimp poses for the camera after a successful mission to space in 1961
30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

13. Unknown soldier in Vietnam, 1965

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

14. Little girl comforting her doll in the ruins of her bomb damaged home, London, 1940

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

15. Illegal alcohol being poured out during Prohibition, Detroit 1929

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

16. Austrian boy receives new shoes during WWII

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

17. Construction of the Berlin wall, 1961

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

18. Animals being used as a part of medical therapy in 1956

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

19. Hitler’s officers and cadets celebrating Christmas, 1941

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

20. Children eating their Christmas dinner during the Great Depression: turnips and cabbage

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

21. The real Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin, ca. 1927

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

22. Abraham Lincoln’s hearse, 1865

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

23. A most beautiful suicide – 23 year old Evelyn McHale leapt to her death from an observation deck (83rd floor) of the Empire State Building, May 1, 1947. She landed on a United Nations limousine…

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

24. A mom and her son watch the mushroom cloud after an atomic test 75 miles away, Las Vegas, 1953

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

25. A penniless mother hides her face in shame after putting her children up for sale, Chicago, 1948

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

26. Annette Kellerman promoted women’s right to wear a fitted one-piece bathing suit, 1907… She was arrested for indecency.

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

27. Martin Luther King Jr. with his son by his side removing a burnt cross from his front yard, 1960

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

28. Walter Yeo, one of the first people to undergo advanced plastic surgery & a skin transplant.

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

29. Princeton students after a freshman vs. sophomores snowball fight in 1893

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

30. Melted and damaged mannequins after a fire at Madam Tussaud’s Wax Museum in London, 1930

30 Unique And Compelling Photos From Our Past

Via CavemanCircus