Tag Archives: art

Taking a Second Glance at Eye-Stopping Landscapes

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Robert Schlaug.

Robert Schlaug would like for you to spend a little more time looking at his work.

“I think our consciousness is exposed to an incredible number of daily stimuli,” Schlaug explained via email. “Every minute we take on a variety of images—only exceptional images remain in our minds. I think we have lost the glance at the little things along the way. With my images I want to work against this.”

One of Schlaug’s methods of getting people to slow down is to view his series “Limited Area.” It’s a series of landscape photographs that have been digitally processed and manipulated. Schlaug acknowledged that many critics have said the series isn’t technically demanding and requires little effort, but that’s inconsequential to Schlaug.

“I think it’s not about the complexity of the technique or manipulation but the feeling and the emotions that trigger the images,” wrote Schlaug.

In 2009 after experimenting with the possibilities of digital photography and image manipulation, Schlaug came up with the idea of “limited area.” It is one of three series that deal with the manipulations of landscapes (“High-Speed Landscape” and “Blurred Sea” are the other two). He traveled around Germany and Spain looking for landscapes to photograph for the series.

From Germany, Schlaug is a self-taught photographer “with longtime experience” who began shooting sports photography before turning to architecture and landscapes.

“As a photographer, for me it’s important to go with my eyes open through daily life and develop a glance for the mundane and banal,” Schlaug expressed via email, “to see things that others no longer perceive in the hustle and bustle of everyday life and in times of total sensory overload.”

Schlaug feels his images appear as a cross-section of landscape that lure the viewer into believing they are seeing something below the surface of the land. It’s an intentional trick that is meant to keep the viewer looking at the image for a longer period of time.

“In a more intense sense … I think my series deals with the human experience of limitation,” wrote Schlaug. “Sometimes we think we run into a wall, stand in front of a precipice, not knowing how to proceed further … even our thoughts and our imagination constantly find limits. My series tries to pull all these experiences together visually.”

“Some years ago the title of one of my exhibitions was ‘Second Glance.’ This expresses exactly what I mean: the second glance I want to achieve with my photographs. It would be great if the viewers of my images gave them a second glance.”

“I think our consciousness is exposed to an incredible number of daily stimuli,” Schlaug explained via email. “Every minute we take on a variety of images – only exceptional images remain in our minds. I think we have lost the glance at the little things along the way. With my images I want to work against this.”

One of Schlaug’s methods of getting people to slow down is to view his series “Limited Area.” It’s a series of landscape photographs that have been digitally processed and manipulated. Schlaug acknowledged that many critics have said the series isn’t technically demanding and requires little effort, but that’s inconsequential to Schlaug.

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limited area 34.Robert Schlaug.

“I think it’s not about the complexity of the technique or manipulation, but the feeling and the emotions that trigger the images,” wrote Schlaug.

In 2009 after experimenting with the possibilities of digital photography and image manipulation, Schlaug came up with the idea of “limited area.” It is one of three series that deal with the manipulations of landscapes (“high speed landscape” and “blurred sea” are the other two). He traveled around Germany and Spain looking for landscapes to photograph for the series.

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limited area 20.Robert Schlaug.

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limited area 03.Robert Schlaug.

From Germany, Schlaug is a self-taught photographer “with longtime experience” who began shooting sports photography before turning to architecture and landscapes.

“As a photographer for me it’s important to go with my eyes open through daily life and develop a glance for the mundane and banal,” Schlaug expressed via email. “To see things that others no longer perceive in the hustle and bustle of everyday life and in times of total sensory overload.”

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limited area 05.Robert Schlaug.

Schlaug feels his images appear as a cross-section of landscape that lure the viewer into believing they are seeing something below the surface of the land. It’s an intentional trick that is meant to keep the viewer looking at the image for a longer period of time.

“In a more intense sense…I think my series deals with the human experience of limitation,” wrote Schlaug. “Sometimes we think we run into a wall, stand in front of a precipice, not knowing how to proceed further…even our thoughts and our imagination constantly find limits. My series tries to pull all these experiences together visually.”

“Some years ago the title of one of my exhibitions was “At Second Glance” This expresses exactly what I mean: the second glance I want to achieve with my photographs. It would be great if the viewers of my images gave them a second glance.”

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limited area 07.Robert Schlaug.

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limited area 04.Robert Schlaug.

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Viruses Made of Glass

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Harmful Viruses Made of Beautiful Glass

Saturday 06.11.2011 , Posted by

When glass blower Luke Jerram saw visualizations of viruses and pathogens in the scientific world he noticed one big theme: color. Wondering what effect the artificial color in normal scientific drawings had on our interpretation of these invisibly small forms, he created his own exquisite versions out of his favorite material: blown glass. Covering such well known maladies as AIDS and Swine Flu, his works are both beautiful and disturbing, challenging observers to reinterpret their view of the tiny organisms. The pieces, each about 1,000,000 times the size of the actual pathogen, were designed with help from virologists from the University of Bristol using a combination of scientific photographs and models. See more of on this unique work at lukejerram.com .

See Also SCIENTIFIC PHENOMENA CAUGHT BEHIND THE LENS

Swine Flu

HIV

E. Coli

E. Coli Detail

Human Papilloma (HPV)

SARS

Small Pox

Malaria

T4 Bacteriophage

 

When East Meets West

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what happens when east meets west?

On a good day, you have received an impressive cross-posted e-mail and you really want to share with your friends. These graphics are striking for me as they show how well the designer observes, analayses  and re-present through her eyes.  Some of you may have already seen it, but it is nice to take another look.

These are icons designed by Liu Yang, a Chinese born but educated in her teen through adult life in Germany.  Her work shows how East meets West.  Her work fits so well with globalization of culture, peoeple and places.

See whether you agree with her.

Blue means the West

Read means the East/ Asian/Chinese

(The Image corresponds to the word/phrase below it)

The boss

me

child

eldery in day to day life

way of life

three meals a day

moods and weather

things that are new

opinion

party

perception of each other

contacts

handling of problem

punctuality

queue in waiting

in the restaurant

shower timing

transportation

travelling

what’s trendy

Perhaps, it is quite a generalization but it is more or less the way of the West and the East. The two parts of the world are learning from each other while the division into two parts is too crude anyway. My favourite is ‘perception of each other’. Here, the West is learning to dreass, drink and eat Asian way, but the East is fond of  modern look, sausage and beer.

What is your favourite?

How do you interpret these graphics?

Liu Yang’s exhibition

Liu Yang was born in 1979 in Beijing, China. She moved to Germany in  1990 and lives there since. She established Yang Liu Design institute in Berlin in 2004.